Pipeline Fire updates: Pipeline Fire is 95% contained (2022)

Table of Contents
2p.m. June 25: Just 5% of Pipeline Fire remains uncontained 10 a.m. June 21: Containment increases to 60%, possibility for rain 12:55p.m.June 20: More evacuation orders lifted 11:45a.m.June 20: Efforts transitioning to repair work 8:30 p.m. June 19: Containment increases to 50% 12:30 p.m. June 19: Crews to assess impact from rain 11:30 a.m. June 18: Focus remains on containment lines 4:15 p.m. June 17: More evacuation orders lifted 1:30p.m. June 17: Resource distribution event for evacuees 12:15 p.m. June 17: Volunteers needed for June 18 sandbag events 10:30 a.m. Flagstaff enters Stage 3 fire restrictions 9:15 a.m. June 17: Pipeline Fire at 26,297 acres, 27% containment 9 a.m. June 17: Less smoke but chance of storms, winds 1:45p.m. Sheriff lifts some evacuation orders 12:30 p.m. June 16: More forest areas to close 11:45 a.m. June 16: Ducey declares state of emergency 10:15 a.m. June 16: Smoke forecast: Moderate impact for northern Flagstaff 9:15 a.m. June 16: Pipeline Fire at 24,815 acres, 27% containment 9 a.m. June 16: US89 reopened north of Flagstaff 9:00 p.m. June 15: Portions of US 89 open; Pipeline Fire 27% contained 1:30 p.m. June 15: Flagstaff to increase fire restrictions 11:50 a.m. June 15: Shelters open for evacuees, pets 11:35 a.m. June 15: What's closed? 11:30 a.m. June 15: Which areas arein 'set' status? 10:45a.m. June 15: Pipeline Fire at 22,888 acres, 31% containment 10 a.m. June 15: Ongoing smoke forecasted 9:45 a.m. June 15: Evacuation orders lifted; who is in 'Go' status FAQs Videos

Corrections & Clarifications: A previous version of the 10 a.m. June 15 entry incorrectly spelled the name of the Hopi Tribe.

Not far from where the Tunnel Fire burned in April and May north of Flagstaff, the Pipeline Fire is burning.

The fire, first reported on June 12, was burning 6 miles north of Flagstaff and just west of Schultz Pass. It has grown rapidly, partially dueto hot and windy conditions. Nearby, the Haywire Fire isalso burning.

The cause of the fire remained under investigation. The U.S. Forest Servicearrested a man in connection with the fireand charged him with federal natural resource violations.

OtherPipeline Fire information:Containment |Smoke| Evacuations| Who is in 'Set' status| Shelters| Closures

Wildfire maps:A look at where fires are burning in the state

Follow coverage of the Pipeline Fire by The Republic reporters here.

2p.m. June 25: Just 5% of Pipeline Fire remains uncontained

The Pipeline Fire is95% contained.

Officials credit "cloud cover, high relative humidity, and precipitation" for reducing the fire. They caution that rain is expected next week and if there are thunderstorms, lightning couldre-ignite or start new conflagrations. There is still personnel and air support on handaround-the-clock to maintain their containment gains.

Firefighters are now working to prevent damage from possible soil erosion stemming fromtheir efforts to diminish the fire.

The Coconino County Sheriff's Office has rescinded all evacuation orders and Highway 89 isno longer shuttered.

10 a.m. June 21: Containment increases to 60%, possibility for rain

Firefighters have increased containment of the Pipeline fire to 60%.

On Tuesday, low pressure was expected to move south along the West Coast as high pressure expandedover the southern states, allowing monsoon moisture to move westward across eastern Arizona.

According to officials, the fire will be on the edge of this moisture with a slight chance of "afternoon showers and thunderstorms."

Lower eastern elevations in Arizona will see northeast winds in the morning and higher elevations should expect southwest winds of 10 to 18 mph. High temperatures will be around 78 degrees at 8,500 feet and around 86 degrees at 6,500 feet, according to fire officials.

— Haleigh Kochanski

12:55p.m.June 20: More evacuation orders lifted

The Coconino County Sheriff's Office lifted and eased evacuation orders for certain communities.

The orders for Crater Estates, Moon Crater, West Alpine Ranchos andthe private properties along U.S. 89 north, from Wupatki Trails to Sacred Mountain Trading Post, were downgraded from "Go" to "Set."

The evacuations for East Alpine Ranchos and U.S. 89 north from Sacred Mountain Trading Post were downgraded from "Set" to "Ready" status.

Most of the national forest land in thoseareas remains closed due to theCoconino National Forest Emergency Fire Closure Order.

Forest Service 545 will remain closed from U.S. 89 to milepost 12 through the Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument.

— Angela Cordoba Perez

11:45a.m.June 20: Efforts transitioning to repair work

The size of the fire grew from26,473 acres to 26,528 acres.Firefighters will start transitioning efforts to suppression repair and will begin pulling equipment that isn't neededdue to progress in containment.

Suppression efforts have been difficult on the western edge of the fire due to steep terrain.

Crews were allowed to resume drainage repair for the Tunnel Fire to mitigate erosion and flooding impacts.

— Angela Cordoba Perez

8:30 p.m. June 19: Containment increases to 50%

Firefighters increased containment to 50% as of 6 p.m.

12:30 p.m. June 19: Crews to assess impact from rain

Firefighters increased containment to 40%.

The fire received minimal moisture from a storm on June 18 andcrews will assess the impacts from the rain, according to an update fromCoconino National Forest.

Smoke may be visible within the fire's perimeter, according to the update.Low to moderate fire behavior is expected, according to Inciweb.

A Type 1 incident management team is in charge of the Pipeline Fire and the Haywire Fire. About 953 personnel are assigned to both fires, and resources include14 hotshot crews, 16 hand crews, 60 engines, six water tenders, nine dozers and nine helicopters.

11:30 a.m. June 18: Focus remains on containment lines

Evacuations remain in place for Shultz Pass Road, Arizona Snowbowl, Crater Estates/Alpine Ranchos West, O’Leary, and east of Highway 89. Evacuation information can be found here.

An area closure is in place on the Coconino National Forest for the Pipeline Fire. See the Forest’s website for full descriptions of road closures and fire restrictions here.

“Several years of persistent drought has much of northern Arizona in severe or extreme drought,” a June 18 Coconino Forest Service news release states. “The drought combined with the time of year has both the live and dead fuels at critically dry levels.”

Officials say the fire is now burning well within the Kachina Peaks Wilderness which has minimal recorded fire history.

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Today’s focus will remain on patrol and containment lines.

“Crews will transition to holding and securing the perimeter lines,” the statement said. “Increasing moisture will bring a chance of thunderstorms. The threat of gusty and erratic winds may require an adaptation of tactics to achieve suppression results.”

As for the Haywire Fire, crews continued to construct fireline along the northern flank of the fire on June 17 and the northeast corner is secured. Officials say fire activity near Stewart Crater has calmed down with the help of suppression activities via helicopter bucket drops and single engine air tanker treatments.

There are approximately 1,157 personnel, including 14 Hotshot crews, 18 hand crews, 68 engines, nine water tenders, 11 dozers and nine helicopters.

Lillian Boyd

4:15 p.m. June 17: More evacuation orders lifted

Additional evacuation orders were lifted in the afternoon of June 17, the Coconino County Sheriff’s Office announced. Some remain in place.

Neighborhoods in “Ready” (just downgraded from “Set”):

  • Neighborhoods along both sides of U.S. 89 from McCann Estates (Silver Saddle Road) to Timberline/Fernwood and up to Wupatki Estates
  • Neighborhoods of Girls Ranch Road, Lenox Park, Pumpkin Patch Road and Hutchison Acres
  • Doney Park North (north of Silver Saddle Road and east of U.S. 89 to Slayton Ranch Road)

Some areas remained in “Go” status:

  • Area north of FS 545 (Sunset Crater National Park entrance) along U.S. 89 to Sacred Mountain Trading Post
  • Medicine Valley
  • Crater Estates/Alpine Ranchos West
  • Areas of Schultz Pass Road
  • Arizona Snowbowl
  • O’Leary

The Pipeline and Haywire fires remained active in those areas and close to private land and homes, per officials.

Areas in “Set” status included Antelope Hills and Alpine Ranchos East.

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“Ready” means residents should prepare to evacuate, watch the situation and pack important items. “Set” means people should prepare to evacuate when given notice. “Go” means leave immediately.

—Alison Steinbach

1:30p.m. June 17: Resource distribution event for evacuees

Evacuees will be able to get produce, pet food, livestock feed and other items at a distribution event on June 18.

The event was scheduled at the Horsemen Lodge Steakhouse at 8500 U.S. 89 in Flagstaff starting at 7 a.m. June 18 and until supplies last.

The Navajo Nation Office of the President and Vice President, Coconino County, Flagstaff Family Food Center and other partners were hosting the distribution for Pipeline and Haywire Fire evacuees.

Several areas remained in “Go” evacuation status as of June 17.

—Alison Steinbach

12:15 p.m. June 17: Volunteers needed for June 18 sandbag events

Flagstaff is preparing for possible flooding from past fires, while flood potential from the current Pipeline Fire was still being evaluated.

Local officials are encouraging residents to volunteer and help fill and replace sandbags to prepare for flood season.

Flagstaff Mayor Paul Deasy told AZFamily on June 16 that the most important thing for the community now is sandbags. He said there are sandbagging events each weekend and that the county had 1 million bags that didn’t yet have cinders.

The city was organizing a volunteer event to distribute sandbags for residents in the Museum Flood area. Shifts were June 18 morning and afternoon, with people meeting at Coconino County Health and Human Services at 2625 King Street. Registration is open here.

Coconino County and United Way of Northern Arizona planned to host another volunteer event June 18 to remove broken sandbags and rebuild sandbag walls in Sunnyside. Registration was open here.

Deasy said the area was already preparing for flooding in the Museum Fire area. He said two washes were expected due to the Tunnel Fire, but with the current fires, he expected 10 flood washes where people would need sandbags.

The city was encouraging residents in the Schultz Creek Watershed and Rio de Flag floodplain to purchase flood insurance immediately.

—Alison Steinbach

10:30 a.m. Flagstaff enters Stage 3 fire restrictions

Flagstaff moved into Stage 3 fire restrictions the morning of June 17.

Restrictions include:

  • No access to sections of the Flagstaff Urban Trail System that enter into Coconino National Forest.
  • No smoking or e-cigarettes in public areas, including parks and open spaces.
  • No open fires, no charcoal grills on private property or in parks or campgrounds.
  • No propane or gas BBQs in city parks and private campgrounds.
  • No propane and gas BBQs at private residences on red flag days.

Coconino County was in Stage 2 fire restrictions for unincorporated county areas. Stage 3 fire restrictions for the county were under review, officials said.

—Alison Steinbach

9:15 a.m. June 17: Pipeline Fire at 26,297 acres, 27% containment

Pipeline Fire was 26,297 acres in size and 27% contained, and the nearby Haywire Fire was 5,449 acres and 11% contained, according to Coconino National Forest officials.

A day earlier, Pipeline was 24,815 acres and 27% containment, and Haywire was 5,372 acres and 11% containment. Firelines constructed by crews held with little growth, officials said.

Fire personnel totaled 916 individuals, made up of 14 hotshot crews, 13 hand crews, 56 engines, nine water tenders, nine dozers and nine helicopters. Resources increased from previous days.

For the Pipeline Fire, crews obtained increased containment along U.S. 89 on June 16 and through the night. Helicopters and other aircraft helped during the day. For both fires, crews worked to reduce available fuels. Firefighters planned to continue constructing direct and indirect lines on June 17 to move toward100% containment on both fires.

Both fires were burning in grass, brush and pine. Fuels were critically dry due to hot and dry weather. Fire activity was expected to increase on June 17 given forecasts of warm, dry and growing winds through the day.

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Later in the night, there isa 20% chance of rain showers and thunderstorms, which could bring strong gusts of wind, dangerous lightning and heavy rain, fire officials said.

Winds were expected to carry smoke to the north-northeast, with impacts on homes to the north and east of Flagstaff, including the Navajo Nation, per officials.

—Alison Steinbach

9 a.m. June 17: Less smoke but chance of storms, winds

The Flagstaff area was expecting to see strong winds throughout the day, including with a wind advisory and red flag warning in effect through 8 p.m., according to the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality. Strong winds could increase fire activity and produce more smoke during the afternoon.

The Doney Park and Flagstaff areas had only light smoke and haze so far inthe morning, an improvement from recent days, per the department.

Smoke was expected to move north-northeast, with possible light to moderate impacts in Tuba City, Cameron and other areas on the Navajo and Hopi reservations.

Possible isolated thunderstorms on June 17 could cause erratic and strong winds, causing smoke to hit areas closer to the fire like Timberline and Doney Park.

Most of the smoke should remain out of Flagstaff, Fort Valley and Doney Park during the evening, per ADEQ.

June 18 was expected to be similar in terms of smoke patterns, but with increased chances of thunderstorms and gusty winds that could impact smoky areas near the fire.

—Alison Steinbach

1:45p.m. Sheriff lifts some evacuation orders

The Coconino County Sheriff’s Office announced midday June 16 it was lifting additional evacuation orderswhile keeping others in place.

Evacuation status changes include:

  • MountElden Lookout Road neighborhoods: “Ready” (downgraded from “Set”).
  • South part of Doney Park (south of Silver Saddle Road to Townsend Winona Road): “Ready” (downgraded from “Set”).
  • Eastern part of Alpine Ranchos: “Set” (downgraded from “Go”).

The north part of Doney Park (north of Silver Saddle Road): remained in “Set” status.

Western part of Alpine Ranchos/Crater Estates, and private properties around Moon Crater: remained in “Go” status. That’s because the Haywire Fire remained active in that area.

Wupatki Trails along U.S. 89 north to Sacred Mountain Trading Post: remained in “Go” status. The Pipeline Fire remained active and close to private land and Medicine Valley homes.

Other "Go" areas included:

  • Areas of Schultz Pass Road
  • Arizona Snowbowl
  • O'Leary
  • East of 89

"Set" areas included:

  • Fernwood
  • Hutchison Acres
  • Antelope Hill
  • McCann Estates
  • West of 89
  • Girls Ranch Road

“Ready” means residents should prepare to evacuate, watch the situation and pack important items. “Set” means people should prepare to evacuate when given notice. “Go” means leave immediately.

Residents can call the fire call center at 928-679-8525 if they have questions or need assistance.

—Alison Steinbach

12:30 p.m. June 16: More forest areas to close

Additional areas in Coconino and Kaibab national forests will close to public access starting June 17 and 18 because of fire danger and for public safety, Coconino National Forest officials announced.

All other areas in the national forests remain in Stage 2 fire restrictions, which generally prohibit fires and smoking.

In Coconino National Forest, the areas of Pumphouse Wash/Kelly Canyon and Fisher Point/Walnut Canyon will close starting June 18 at 8 a.m. All campgrounds, forest roads and recreation sites within the areas will be closed.

Most of the Coconino National Forest north of Interstate 40 was already closed for the Pipeline Fire.

In Kaibab National Forest, the area of Bill Williams Mountain will close starting June 17 at 8 a.m. All forest lands, roads and trails within the closure area will be inaccessible. The area is near Route 66 in Williams.

People with private inholdings will be able to go to their property but not enter surrounding lands.

Forest closures are coordinated with local, tribal, state and federal partners, and are typically the last resort, according to officials. The closures will stay in place until hot and dry conditions let up and the forests get enough rain to lower the fire danger.

Violating closures or fire restrictions results in federal court appearances and fines or prison time.

More area closures or full forest closures could still be implemented if needed, per forest officials.

The following trails and attractions remain closed:

  • Buffalo Park.
  • Schultz Creek Natural Area.
  • Observatory Mesa Natural Area.
  • Certain Flagstaff Urban Trail System entrances.
  • Arizona Snowbowl.

—Alison Steinbach

11:45 a.m. June 16: Ducey declares state of emergency

Gov. Doug Ducey declared a state of emergency due to the Pipeline Fire on June 16.

The declaration of emergency allows the region to receive more resources and support to respond to the fires. Ducey directed $200,000 in general fund money go to the state emergency management division to coordinate state assets.

“Public safety is our top priority,” Ducey said in a statement. “As state and local fire officials work to contain the blaze, our office will ensure emergency officials have the resources to respond to and recover from the fire’s scars.”

Ducey said the state will work with partners on the ground to provide “all support necessary to mitigate the fire and protect people, pets and property.”

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The city of Flagstaff and Coconino County earlier in the week made their own emergency declarations.

In late April, Ducey declared a state of emergency for the Tunnel Fire, which burned nearly 20,000 acres in the same region as the current fires.

“For a community still recovering from the path of the Tunnel Fire in April, this new blaze is a reminder for all Arizonans to be vigilant and safe this wildfire season,” Ducey said.

—Alison Steinbach

10:15 a.m. June 16: Smoke forecast: Moderate impact for northern Flagstaff

Smoke was in the Doney Park area and northern Flagstaff on Thursday morning, but was not as strong as it was the day before, according to the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality. Smoke was expected to lift by mid-morning.

Stronger winds were expected on June 16, meaning the fire could be more active and produce more smoke. That smoke was predicted to move to the north-northeast, mostly out of Flagstaff and Doney Park. Cameron and Tuba City could see light to moderate smoke impacts, according to the agency.

Moderate smoke impacts may hit Doney Park and northern Flagstaff areas overnight, but should clear out the next morning. Cameron, Tuba City and other Navajo and Hopi reservation areas were expected to have light to moderate smoke impacts on June 17.

A chance of thunderstorms on June 17 could cause winds to move smoke around for short-term moderate to high smoke impacts in areas near the fire, according to ADEQ.

—Alison Steinbach

9:15 a.m. June 16: Pipeline Fire at 24,815 acres, 27% containment

Pipeline Fire was 24,815 acres in size and 27% contained, and the nearby Haywire Fire was 5,372 acres and 11% contained, according to Coconino National Forest officials the morning of June 16.

A day earlier, Pipeline was 22,888 acres and 31% containment, and Haywire was 5,065 acres and 0% containment.

The Type 2 California Incident Management Team 15 took charge of the Pipeline and Haywire fires, but will transfer to a Type 1 team later on Thursday.

Fire personnel totaled 740 individuals, made up of 14 hotshot crews, nine hand crews, 57 engines, nine water tenders, four dozers and nine helicopters.

Both fires were burning in grass, brush and pine. Fire activity was expected to increase on June 16 given forecasts of warm, dry and breezy weather, with hot and dry conditions contributing to very dry fuels.

Winds were expected to carry smoke toward the northwest in the morning and then northeast, hitting areas north and east of Flagstaff like the Navajo Nation.

Crews got increased containment along U.S. 89 on June 15 with the help of ground crews and aircraft. Firefighters planned to construct direct and indirect line on June 16 to move toward100% containment on both fires.

—Alison Steinbach

9 a.m. June 16: US89 reopened north of Flagstaff

The U.S. 89 highway reopened farther north of Flagstaff after it was closed due to the Pipeline Fire, the Arizona Department of Transportation announced.

The highway was opened for all lanes. But the right lane was still blocked in both directions from milepost 429 to 433 due to fire impacts.

Nearly the entire northern part of the Coconino National Forest remains closed from Interstate 40 to the north.

Coconino National Forest submitted a request for Stage 3 closures to the regional office and up to Washington, D.C., and expected an answer in the coming days.

The following trails and attractions remain closed:

  • Buffalo Park.
  • Schultz Creek Natural Area.
  • Observatory Mesa Natural Area.
  • Certain Flagstaff Urban Trail System entrances.
  • Arizona Snowbowl.

—Alison Steinbach

9:00 p.m. June 15: Portions of US 89 open; Pipeline Fire 27% contained

The Arizona Department of Transportation announcedJune 15 thatportions of the U.S. 89 highwayreopened after being closed on June 12 due to the fire.

The highway was opened in both directions from mileposts 426 to 433 and remainedclosed in both directions from mileposts 433 to 445.There wasno estimated time to reopen the road.

As of Wednesday night, the Pipeline Fire had consumed 22,888 acres and was 27% contained.

Joanna Jacobo Rivera

1:30 p.m. June 15: Flagstaff to increase fire restrictions

Flagstaff Mayor Paul Deasy said on Twitter the city would move to Stage 3 fire restrictions starting June 17 at 8 a.m.

Those restrictions include:

  • Closure of Flagstaff Urban Trail System
  • No smoking in public areas, including parks and open spaces
  • No open fires, no charcoal grills on private property
  • No propane grills on private property during red flag days

Flagstaff was already in Stage 2 fire restrictions, according to its website. Stage 3 bans everything that Stage 2 does, with the addition of prohibiting barbecues in city parks and at private residences, plus closing Flagstaff trail access.

—Alison Steinbach

11:50 a.m. June 15: Shelters open for evacuees, pets

The American Red Cross has a shelter at Sinagua Middle School at 3950 E. Butler Ave. in Flagstaff for residents evacuated due to the fire.

The Navajo Nation was also offering emergency shelter at the Twin Arrows Navajo Casino Resort (22181 Resort Blvd, Flagstaff), with information available at 928-856-7200.

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The U.S. Postal Service was holding mail for households in “Go” status at 2400 Postal Blvd., and FedEx was doing the same for packages at its location across from the Flagstaff Airport.

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People evacuating can bring household animals to Coconino Humane Association at 3501 E Butler Ave. and their livestock to self-service stables at Fort Tuthill County Stables.

Volunteers can sign up to help during the fire and with post-wildfire flooding at uwna.volunteerhub.com. United Way of Northern Arizona has a crisis fund and was accepting donations through texting UWNAZRESPONSE to 41444 or online.

The fire call center number is 928-679-8525.

—Alison Steinbach

11:35 a.m. June 15: What's closed?

U.S. 89 was closed in both directions north of Flagstaff, according to the Arizona Department of Transportation. The southbound side was closed at milepost 445 and the northbound side was closed at milepost 427. There is no estimated time for the road to reopen.

Nearly the entire northern part of the Coconino National Forest was closed from Interstate 40 to the north.

Local forest service officials said June 14 that they were coordinatingto potentially implement Stage 3 fire restrictions, which would mean full closure of the Coconino National Forest. The public would not be able to enter any national forest lands, roads or trails due to extreme fire danger.

Coconino National Forest had submitted a request for Stage 3 closures to the regional office and up to Washington, D.C., and expected an answer in the coming days.

The following trails and attractions are closed:

  • Buffalo Park.
  • Schultz Creek Natural Area.
  • Observatory Mesa Natural Area.
  • certain Flagstaff Urban Trail System entrances.
  • Arizona Snowbowl.

—Alison Steinbach

11:30 a.m. June 15: Which areas arein 'set' status?

The Coconino County Sheriff's Office said Wednesdaythe majority of residents who have been evacuated from Timberline neighborhoods are allowed to return immediately.

The following areas were moved from "Go" to "Set" status June 14:

  • Hutchison Acres
  • Fernwood
  • Doney Park
  • Silver Saddle Trailer Park.
  • McCann Estates.

An evacuation "Set" status remains for these areas:

  • Mt. Elden Lookout Road.
  • Mt. Elden Estates.
  • S Campbell including Linda Lane, east ofPinon lane.
  • Antelope Hills areas.

— P. Kim Bui and Angela Cordoba Perez

10:45a.m. June 15: Pipeline Fire at 22,888 acres, 31% containment

The Pipeline Fire was 22,888 acres in size and at 31% containment and the nearby Haywire Fire was 5,065 acres and 0% containment, Coconino National Forest officials said June 15.

Pipeline Fire was at 0% containment on June 14, marking significant progress during the day and overnight as wind speeds lowered.

The Type 1 Great Basin Incident Management Team 2 arrived at the fires and was shadowing the Type 2 California Interagency Incident Management Team 15 that’s currently in charge.

The Type 1 team will take over in themorning on June 16.

Aircrafts were dropping water and retardant and crews are looking for ways to engage directly with the fire to put out its edge and keep it from entering communities, officials said.

The Pipeline Fire had 561 fire personnel made up of 12 hotshot crews, seven hand crews, 54 engines, nine water tenders and two dozers, per officials.

The Haywire Fire had 57 fire personnel made up of one hand crew, six engines, two water tenders and two dozers.

Eight helicopters and one fixed-wing aircraft were working on both fires, officials said June 15.

—Alison Steinbach

10 a.m. June 15: Ongoing smoke forecasted

Smoke impacts were expected to be moderate on the morning of June 15, with some high smoke impacts across Flagstaff and in the Doney Park area. The smoke was expected to start clearing by 9:30 a.m., according to the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality.

Winds were forecast to be lighter on June 15 and the majority of smoke should move to the northeast/east, with some impacts in Doney Park and Winona during the day. Light to moderate smoke impacts may hit the Navajo and Hopireservations, per ADEQ.

Smoke should drain back into Doney Park, Fort Valley, Bellemont and Flagstaff during the night of June 15, with the highest impacts in Doney Park and the northern part of Flagstaff. Smoke is expected to lift again in the morning on June 16.

A portable smoke monitor was installed in Doney Park on June 14due to the forecasted smoke impacts, according to ADEQ officials.

ADEQ officials say people in areas with heavy smoke impacts can close winds, turn off swamp coolers, use filtered HVAC systems and avoid being active outside.

—Alison Steinbach

9:45 a.m. June 15: Evacuation orders lifted; who is in 'Go' status

Residents in the Timberline community saw their “Go” evacuation status lifted the morning of June 15 after they evacuated on June 12. The Coconino County Sheriff’s Office was allowing them to return home.

A number of areas were still on “Go” status because of fire personnel in the area and unsafe conditions. Those include, per the sheriff’s office:

  • S Campbell Avenue west of Lupine Lane (Lupine Lane is now in “SET”)
  • Crestview Street west of Valley Drive (Valley Drive is now in “SET”)
  • Glodia Drive
  • Girls Ranch Road
  • Alice Drive
  • Saddle Avenue
  • Pinon Street
  • El Oro Drive
  • N Siesta Lane
  • E. Paintbrush Lane
  • Copeland Lane west of Rope Arabian Rd. (Rope Arabian is now in “SET”)
  • N. Copeland Lane, Tanager Drive, Barn Road, Peaceful Way, and Weed Lane

Those areas still had fire crews working and assessing damages, according to Coconino County officials. Officials said fire personnel need to check for any hazards before allowing residents to re-enter.

Evacuation statuses were being continually reevaluated, per county officials.

A map with evacuation areas marked as “Go” and “Set” is available at this link.

—Alison Steinbach

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FAQs

What does it mean when a fire is 10% contained? ›

Containment, normally expressed as a percentage, indicates how much of the fire has been enclosed by a control line. A wildfire with 25% containment means control lines have been completed around 25% of the fire's perimeter.

What does it mean for a fire to be percent contained? ›

Percent contained

Having 100% containment doesn't mean the fire is out. It just means the fire agency has containment lines around it. There can still be burning, smoldering and active flames.

Is the pipeline fire in Flagstaff contained? ›

On Monday morning, more than 26,000 acres had burned as fire officials announced a pivotal milestone: the wildfire was now about 50% contained. However, firefighters still note that the Pipeline Fire is still active near Sunset Crater and near the Tunnel Fire burn scar, which was sparked in April earlier this year.

Who started the pipeline fire in Flagstaff? ›

Matthew Riser pleaded guilty on Wednesday to a single count of prohibited use of fire, a class B petty offense. A judge then sentenced him to one year of probation.

Does 100% containment mean the fire is out? ›

It's important to note that containment does not mean a fire is out, or that the danger has passed. Although it is an indicator of progress, the containment percentage doesn't always correlate to safety level around or within the fire.

What happens after a fire is contained? ›

“What happens is that it gets to a point where all the federal and state firefighters leave and go back to their respected jobs, and then local resources will continue patrolling the area,” he added.

How is containment of fire calculated? ›

The percentage measurement numbers refer to how much of a fire's perimeter is surrounded by a fire line. For example, if three miles of fire line has been constructed around a wildfire that 10 miles in circumference then the fire is 30 percent contained.

What percentage is the Dixie fire contained? ›

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Burning almost one million acres across Northern California, the Dixie Fire is 100% contained after more than three months of destruction.

How long does it take to contain a fire? ›

From the time a fire starts until it is extinguished will take an average of 38 minutes. Though firefighters have a lot more work and will frequently stay for hours after the fire has been put out. And remember, this time can be all over the place, this is just a rough average.

How much of the pipeline fire is contained? ›

Current Situation
Total Personnel35
Size26,532 Acres
Percent of Perimeter Contained90%
2 more rows

Is the Arizona fire contained? ›

WIKIEUP, Ariz.

- A wildfire that forced evacuations from the unincorporated Mohave County community of Wikieup in northwestern Arizona is now 40% contained. Officials with the Arizona Department of Forestry and Fire Management said the wildfire burned 150 acres as of July 22.

What started the pipeline fire? ›

The Arizona wildfire that has spread uncontrollably since Sunday morning was started when a man attempted to burn toilet paper, authorities said. Matthew Riser, 57, was arrested Sunday.

How contained is the pipeline fire? ›

The Pipeline Fire is 95% contained. Officials credit "cloud cover, high relative humidity, and precipitation" for reducing the fire.

What caused the pipeline fire in Arizona? ›

- The Pipeline Fire sparked just a few miles from Flagstaff and according to court documents, it was caused by a man who lit his toilet paper on fire after defecating in the forest. The fire was reported at 10:15 a.m. and it started 6 miles north of Flagstaff on June 12.

How did Tunnel fire Flagstaff start? ›

In a community meeting on April 23, Matt McGrath, Flagstaff district ranger in the Coconino National Forest, said the fire started where campfires are restricted and don't believe it was started by lightning. Residents impacted by the fire pressed fire officials during that meeting over their response to the event.

What does contained mean in a forest fire? ›

The status of a wildfire suppression action signifying that a control line has been completed around the fire, and any associated spot fires, which can reasonably be expected to stop the fire's spread.

What does mopping up a fire mean? ›

For our wildland firefighters, mopping-up describes the hard physical labor process of extinguishing or removing burning material near control lines down to the mineral soil, felling fire damaged trees, and cooling ash pits to make a fireline less likely to escape or to reduce residual smoke.

What does extreme fire behavior mean? ›

Extreme implies a level of fire behavior characteristics that ordinarily precludes methods of direct control action. One or more of the following is usually involved: high rate of spread, prolific crowning and/or spotting, presence of fire whirls, strong convection column.

What can you keep after a fire? ›

Generally, any item that's strong enough to survive the heat and the flames without absorbing water and smoke is completely salvageable after a fire. It might be a little stained, but it's nothing a little cleaning won't fix.

How can an area be restored after a fire? ›

Actions include: planting trees, reestablishing native species, repairing damage to facilities such as buildings, campgrounds, and fences, restoring habitats and treating invasive plants.

What does containment mean in history? ›

Containment was a geopolitical strategic foreign policy pursued by the United States during the Cold War to prevent the spread of communism after the end of World War II. The name was loosely related to the term cordon sanitaire, which was containment of the Soviet Union in the 1940s.

What describes the estimated spread of the fire at the head of the fire? ›

The most common description of a fire's rate of progression is that of the speed of the fire front in the direction of or with the prevailing wind. This is called the rate of forward spread or forward rate of spread and refers to the head of the fire and has the fastest speed of a fire (Cheney 1990).

Is the fire contained in Wears Valley? ›

The Indigo fire in Wears Valley is 100% contained. Nearly 2,500 acres burned in the Great Smoky Mountains community popular with tourists. Authorities determined the count of buildings burned is significantly lower than first expected. Now they say 219 structures were affected.

How much of the California fire is contained? ›

The wildfire is now 26% contained and has burned 18,087 acres as of Tuesday morning. This modest increase came after the fire doubled in size from Saturday to Sunday morning. The fire is the largest in the state so far this year, prompting Governor Gavin Newsom to proclaim a state of emergency.

What is the largest fire in US history? ›

The 1871 Peshtigo Fire, Wisconsin

At least 1 152 people were killed, making this the worst fire that claimed more lives than any of the other wildfires in US history.

Why can't they put out the Dixie Fire? ›

Lightning ensues, sparking more flames. The fast-moving fire destroyed large swathes of Greenville, a historic mountain town. These tall infernos, reaching into the crowns of trees, are often impossible to fully control because of their extreme severity.

Can cigarette ashes start a fire? ›

A lit cigarette accidentally dropped onto a chair or bed, or hot cigarette ashes or matches tossed away before they are completely out, can cause a large fire in seconds.

Can paper ashes start a fire? ›

NEVER dispose of ashes in a paper or plastic bag, cardboard box, plastic container or bucket because it can easily ignite and DO NOT place any other combustibles in the metal container.

What comes first smoke or fire? ›

Smoke comes from a fire when there is not enough oxygen to burn the fuel completely. We call this incomplete combustion. When everything in a fire is burned, producing just water and carbon dioxide, that's called complete combustion. When incomplete combustion occurs Smoke is created.

Who started pipeline fire? ›

On Sunday, authorities arrested 57-year-old Matthew Riser after a forest official said he started the fire and tried to drive off in a white pickup truck along Snowbowl Road. Riser, who is from Louisiana, initially told Coconino County deputies that he was camping when he saw the fire spark.

How many acres are burning in Flagstaff Arizona? ›

The exact size the the Pipeline Fire is unknown due to the inability for an overnight infrared flight. However, fire managers estimate the fire to be about 5,000 acres currently.

How many acres is Flagstaff pipeline fire? ›

As of Wednesday morning, Coconino County forest officials said that the latest estimate placed the Pipeline Fire at 22,888 acres burned with 33% containment.

Has the pipeline fire burned any homes? ›

After being evacuated for days, Cobb's home and family are safe from the Pipeline Fire, burning north of Flagstaff. As of Thursday, it has burned 24,815 acres and is 27% contained.

Are the Arizona fires still burning? ›

There are no major wildfires currently burning in Arizona. Arizona's wildfire season, which got off to an early start this year, could be even more catastrophic in 2022 than in previous years, fire officials have said. Arizona lost over 500,000 acres to wildfires in 2021 and over 900,000 acres in 2020, Gov.

What fires are burning in New Mexico? ›

Reported fires from NWCG and CAL FIRE
NameTypeSize
StaymanWildfire1,200 Acres
Committee FireWildfire281 Acres
Water Canyon FireWildfire147 Acres
WoodtickWildfire38 Acres
74 more rows

Can natural gas burn underwater? ›

A gush of gas can form a flash flame; this flame then breaks, resulting in a small flamelet that spreads on the water surface. Increasing the leakage pressure enhances the burning process and the flamelet gradually disappears.

How did they put out the fire in the Gulf of Mexico? ›

As the gas rose to the water's surface, it was hit with electrical shocks from the storm, causing the fire to break out, the company said. Firefighting vessels were deployed to extinguish the fire by closing the pipeline's valve and injecting it with nitrogen.

Who was responsible for the Olympic pipeline explosion? ›

Olympic, Equilon and several employees faced a seven count indictment after the investigation in 2002. The companies pleaded guilty to several of the charges, leading to a $112 million settlement, a record at the time.

What is 30 contained fire? ›

A wildfire with 30% containment means control lines have been completed around 30% of the fire's perimeter. So what is a control line? Constructed or natural barriers used to stop wildfire from spreading. Firefights can create them with controlled burns to remove fuel before the wildfire reaches it.

How is fire containment calculated? ›

The percentage measurement numbers refer to how much of a fire's perimeter is surrounded by a fire line. For example, if three miles of fire line has been constructed around a wildfire that 10 miles in circumference then the fire is 30 percent contained.

How long does it take for wildfires to be contained? ›

U.S. wildfire seasons now last an average 76 days longer than in the 1970s and 1980s. Before 1986, a wildfire was contained on average in less than eight days. Since then, the average wildfire has burned for 37 days.

What percentage is the Dixie fire contained? ›

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Burning almost one million acres across Northern California, the Dixie Fire is 100% contained after more than three months of destruction.

Videos

1. Oil pipeline burns after attack by militants
(AP Archive)
2. The Woman Who Was Burned Alive By A Drunk Driver | The Oprah Winfrey Show | Oprah Winfrey Network
(OWN)
3. Russia Cuts Gas To Europe: Slows Nord Stream 1 Pipeline to 20%
(Financially Aware)
4. Pipeline Thermal Insulation using Liquid Nano-Thermal Coatings "ISOLLAT", Safe,Easy & Effective
(IZOTECK Thermal Insulation Technology)
5. Man, 74, found alive after 5 days inside fire-gutted complex
(CBS 17)
6. 'The Five' criticize Biden for shutting down US pipeline, endorsing Russia's
(Fox News)

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